The benefits of using FamilySearch’s individual databases

It almost goes without saying that FamilySearch has a veritable cornucopia of free resources for genealogists and family history enthusiasts. However, it would seem, many aren’t getting the most out of this exceptional free research services. Why? Most FamilySearch users stick to the general database search option.

Did you know there are literally millions of free records available on FamilySearch that aren’t accessible via the main search option? There are. In truth, the vast amount of FamilySearch’s collections can’t be found via the search on their site. From my own experience, some of the most brilliant family history and genealogy gems I found were through the many individual databases available on FamilySearch – and not its  main search engine.

The article below steps you through why delving into these individual records databases needs to be an important part of your research practice:

Millions of Free Records on FamilySearch Can’t Be Found via Search: Here’s How to Access Them:
http://familyhistorydaily.com/tips-and-tricks/millions-of-free-records-on-familysearch-cant-be-found-via-search-heres-how-to-access-them

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1 Comment

Filed under ancestry, family history, genealogy

One response to “The benefits of using FamilySearch’s individual databases

  1. This is so true. Here is my most exciting example.

    https://digginupgraves.wordpress.com/2014/12/28/willie-ann-rowe-blue-she-really-is-reuben-rowes-daughter-52-ancestors/

    Up until that point, it seemed that “nobody” had convincing evidence that Reuben Rowe was the father of Willie Ann Rowe, wife of John Michael Blue, and up until that point, I relied solely on the indexed searches.

    Thanks for this relevant information.

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